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The Calling Of Saint Matthew, Oil by Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi) (1571-1610, Italy)

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Art Reproduction Fine Art The Calling Of Saint Matthew - Oil By Caravaggio , Art Reproduction Fine Art The Calling Of Saint Matthew - Oil By Caravaggio
The Calling Of Saint Matthew, Oil by Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi) (1571-1610, Italy)
Art Reproduction Fine Art The Calling Of Saint Matthew - Oil By Caravaggio , Art Reproduction Fine Art The Calling Of Saint Matthew - Oil By Caravaggio

"The Calling Of Saint Matthew"

Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi) - Oil

A masterpiece by Caravaggio, depicting the Calling of Matthew. It was completed in 1599-1600 for the Contarelli Chapel in the church of the French congregation, San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome. The painting depicts the story from the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 9:9): Jesus saw a man named Matthew at his seat in the custom house, and said to him, "Follow me", and Matthew rose and followed him. In this painting, the gloom and the canvassed window appears to situate the table indoors. Christ brings the true light to the dark space of the sitting tax-collectors. This painting records the collision of two worlds — the ineluctable power of the immortal faith, and the mundane, foppish, world of Levi. Jesus spears him with a beam of light, with an apparent effortless hand gesture he exerts an inescapable sublime gravity, with no need for wrenching worldly muscularity. Jesus' bare feet are classical simplicity in contrast with the dandified accountants
being barefoot may also symbolize holiness, as if one is on holy ground. Similarly to his treatment of Paul in the Conversion on the Way to Damascus, Caravaggio chronicles the moment when a daily routine is interrupted by the miraculous. Around the man to become Matthew are either the unperceptive or unperturbed bystanders.



 
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The Calling Of Saint Matthew, Oil by Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi) (1571-1610, Italy)
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A masterpiece by Caravaggio, depicting the Calling of Matthew. It was completed in 1599-1600 for the Contarelli Chapel in the church of the French congregation, San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome. The painting depicts the story from the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 9:9): Jesus saw a man named Matthew at his seat in the custom house, and said to him, "Follow me", and Matthew rose and followed him. In this painting, the gloom and the canvassed window appears to situate the table indoors. Christ brings the true light to the dark space of the sitting tax-collectors. This painting records the collision of two worlds — the ineluctable power of the immortal faith, and the mundane, foppish, world of Levi. Jesus spears him with a beam of light, with an apparent effortless hand gesture he exerts an inescapable sublime gravity, with no need for wrenching worldly muscularity. Jesus' bare feet are classical simplicity in contrast with the dandified accountants; being barefoot may also symbolize holiness, as if one is on holy ground. Similarly to his treatment of Paul in the Conversion on the Way to Damascus, Caravaggio chronicles the moment when a daily routine is interrupted by the miraculous. Around the man to become Matthew are either the unperceptive or unperturbed bystanders.
Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi)
Oil
Oil
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