+ 1 (707) 877-4321
+ 33 977-198-888
English
Français
Deutsch
Italiano
Español
Русский
中国
Português
日本

Mill at Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras, Oil by Jean Baptiste Camille Corot (1796-1875, France)

FREE Shipping. FREE Returns All the time. See details.

Framed Giclee Fine Art Jean Baptiste Camille Corot , Oil Painting Fine Art Jean Baptiste Camille Corot
Mill at Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras, Oil by Jean Baptiste Camille Corot (1796-1875, France)
Framed Print Fine Art Jean Baptiste Camille Corot , Framed Giclee Fine Art Jean Baptiste Camille Corot

"Mill at Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras"

Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - Oil

Mill at Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras (1874)
Oil on canvas
This painting from the late period of the artist was painted in northern France when he was a guest at the house of his friend, Robaut, not far from Arras. The painting (65 x 81 cm) is now in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay, Paris.



 
Giclee Print on canvas   Reproduction
Buy a giclée print of this artwork of Jean Baptiste Camille Corot Do you want to buy a giclee print on cotton canvas of this artwork from Jean Baptiste Camille Corot ?
WahooArt.com use only the most modern and efficient printing technology on our 100% cotton canvases 400gsm, based on the Giclée printing procedure. This innovative high resolution printing technique results in durable and spectacular looking prints of the highest quality.
Do not hesitate order your print now !


  Buy a Jean Baptiste Camille Corot hand made copy For just a little more than a print you can have a hand made reproduction of a painting of Jean Baptiste Camille Corot.
With our talented oil painters, we offer 100% hand made oil paintings on various subjects and styles.
Click here to buy a hand made oil reproduction of this Jean Baptiste Camille Corot Artwork

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (French pronunciation: ​[ʒɑ̃ ba.tist ka.mij kɔ.ʁo]) (July 16, 1796 – February 22, 1875) was a French landscape painter and printmaker in etching. Corot was the leading painter of the Barbizon school of France in the mid-nineteenth century. He is a pivotal figure in landscape painting and his vast output simultaneously references the Neo-Classical tradition and anticipates the plein-air innovations of Impressionism.

Camille Corot was born in Paris in 1796, in a house at 125 Rue du Bac, now demolished. His family were bourgeois people—his father was a wigmaker and his mother a milliner—and unlike the experience of some of his artistic colleagues, throughout his life he never felt the want of money, as his parents made good investments and ran their businesses well. After his parents married, they bought the millinery shop where his mother had worked and his father gave up his career as a wigmaker to run the business side of the shop. The store was a famous destination for fashionable Parisians and earned the family an excellent income. Corot was the second of three children born to the family, who lived above their shop during those years.

Corot received a scholarship to study at the Lycée Pierre-Corneille in Rouen, but left after having scholastic difficulties and entered a boarding school. He "was not a brilliant student, and throughout his entire school career he did not get a single nomination for a prize, not even for the drawing classes." Unlike many masters who demonstrated early talent and inclinations toward art, before 1815 Corot showed no such interest. During those years he lived with the Sennegon family, whose patriarch was a friend of Corot's father and who spent much time with young Corot on nature walks. It was in this region that Corot made his first paintings after nature. At nineteen, Corot was a "big child, shy and awkward. He blushed when spoken to. Before the beautiful ladies who frequented his mother's salon, he was embarrassed and fled like a wild thing... Emotionally, he was an affectionate and well-behaved son, who adored his mother and trembled when his father spoke." When Corot's parents moved into a new residence in 1817, the 21-year-old Corot moved into the dormer-windowed room on the third floor, which became his first studio as well.

With his father's help he apprenticed to a draper, but he hated commercial life and despised what he called "business tricks", yet he faithfully remained in the trade until he was 26, when his father consented to his adopting the profession of art. Later Corot stated, "I told my father that business and I were simply incompatible, and that I was getting a divorce." The business experience proved beneficial, however, by helping him develop an aesthetic sense through his exposure to the colors and textures of the fabrics. Perhaps out of boredom, he turned to oil painting around 1821 and began immediately with landscapes. Starting in 1822 after the death of his sister, Corot began receiving a yearly allowance of 1500 francs which adequately financed his new career, studio, materials, and travel for the rest of his life. He immediately rented a studio on quai Voltaire.

During the period when Corot acquired the means to devote himself to art, landscape painting was on the upswing and generally divided into two camps: one―historical landscape by Neoclassicists in Southern Europe representing idealized views of real and fancied sites peopled with ancient, mythological, and biblical figures; and two―realistic landscape, more common in Northern Europe, which was largely faithful to actual topography, architecture, and flora, and which often showed figures of peasants. In both approaches, landscape artists would typically begin with outdoor sketching and preliminary painting, with finishing work done indoors. Highly influential upon French landscape artists in the early 19th century was the work of Englishmen John Constable and J.M.W. Turner, who reinforced the trend in favor of Realism and away from Neoclassicism.

For a short period between 1821–1822, Corot studied with Achille-Etna Michallon, a landscape painter of Corot's age who was a protégé of the painter David and who was already a well-respected teacher. Michallon had a great influence on Corot's career. Corot's drawing lessons included tracing lithographs, copying three-dimensional forms, and making landscape sketches and paintings outdoors, especially in the forests of Fontainebleau, the seaports along Normandy, and the villages west of Paris such as Ville-d'Avray (where his parents had a country house). Michallon also exposed him to the principles of the French Neoclassic tradition, as espoused in the famous treatise of theorist Pierre-Henri de Valenciennes, and exemplified in the works of French Neoclassicists Claude Lorrain and Nicolas Poussin, whose major aim was the representation of ideal Beauty in nature, linked with events in ancient times.

Though this school was on the decline, it still held sway in the Salon, the foremost art exhibition in France attended by thousands at each event. Corot later stated, "I made my first landscape from nature…under the eye of this painter, whose only advice was to render with the greatest scrupulousness everything I saw before me. The lesson worked; since then I have always treasured precision." After Michallon's early death in 1822, Corot studied with Michallon's teacher, Jean-Victor Bertin, among the best known Neoclassic landscape painters in France, who had Corot draw copies of lithographs of botanical subjects to learn precise organic forms. Though holding Neoclassicists in the highest regard, Corot did not limit his training to their tradition of allegory set in imagined nature. His notebooks reveal precise renderings of tree trunks, rocks, and plants which show the influence of Northern realism. Throughout his career, Corot demonstrated an inclination to apply both traditions in his work, sometimes combining the two.

With his parents' support, Corot followed the well-established pattern of French painters who went to Italy to study the masters of the Italian Renaissance and to draw the crumbling monuments of Roman antiquity. A condition by his parents before leaving was that he paint a self-portrait for them, his first. Corot's stay in Italy from 1825 to 1828 was a highly formative and productive one, during which he completed over 200 drawings and 150 paintings. He worked and traveled with several young French painters also studying abroad who painted together and socialized at night in the cafes, critiquing each other and gossiping. Corot learned little from the Renaissance masters (though later he cited Leonardo da Vinci as his favorite painter) and spent most of his time around Rome and in the Italian countryside. The Farnese Gardens with its splendid views of the ancient ruins was a frequent destination, and he painted it at three different times of the day. The training was particularly valuable in gaining an understanding of the challenges of both the mid-range and panoramic perspective, and in effectively placing man-made structures in a natural setting. He also learned how to give buildings and rocks the effect of volume and solidity with proper light and shadow, while using a smooth and thin technique. Furthermore, placing suitable figures in a secular setting was a necessity of good landscape painting, to add human context and scale, and it was even more important in allegorical landscapes. To that end Corot worked on figure studies in native costume as well as nude. During winter, he spent time in a studio but returned to work outside as quickly as weather permitted. The intense light of Italy posed considerable challenges, "This sun gives off a light that makes me despair. It makes me feel the utter powerlessness of my palette." He learned to master the light and to paint the stones and sky in subtle and dramatic variation.

It was not only Italian architecture and light which captured Corot's attention. The late-blooming Corot was entranced with Italian females as well, "They still have the most beautiful women in the world that I have met….their eyes, their shoulders, their hands are spectacular. In that, they surpass our women, but on the other hand, they are not their equals in grace and kindness…Myself, as a painter I prefer the Italian woman, but I lean toward the French woman when it comes to emotion." In spite of his strong attraction to women, he writes of his commitment to painting, "I have only one goal in life that I want to pursue faithfully: to make landscapes. This firm resolution keeps me from a serious attachment. That is to say, in marriage…but my independent nature and my great need for serious study make me take the matter lightly."

During the six-year period following his first Italian visit and his second, Corot focused on preparing large landscapes for presentation at the Salon. Several of his salon paintings were adaptations of his Italian oil sketches reworked in the studio by adding imagined, formal elements consistent with Neoclassical principles. An example of this was his first Salon entry, View at Narni (1827), where he took his quick, natural study of a ruin of a Roman aqueduct in dusty bright sun and transformed it into a falsely idyllic pastoral setting with giant shade trees and green lawns, a conversion meant to appeal to the Neoclassical jurors. Many critics have valued highly his plein-air Italian paintings for their "germ of Impressionism", their faithfulness to natural light, and their avoidance of academic values, even though they were intended as studies. Several decades later, Impressionism revolutionized art by a taking a similar approach—quick, spontaneous painting done in the out-of-doors; however, where the Impressionists used rapidly applied, un-mixed colors to capture light and mood, Corot usually mixed and blended his colors to get his dreamy effects.

When out of the studio, Corot traveled throughout France, mirroring his Italian methods, and concentrated on rustic landscapes. He returned to the Normandy coast and to Rouen, the city he lived in as a youth. Corot also did some portraits of friends and relatives, and received his first commissions. His sensitive portrait of his niece, Laure Sennegon, dressed in powder blue, was one of his most successful and was later donated to the Louvre. He typically painted two copies of each family portrait, one for the subject and one for the family, and often made copies of his landscapes as well. Corot exhibited one portrait and several landscapes at the Salon in 1831 and 1833. His reception by the critics at the Salon was cool and Corot decided to return to Italy, having failed to satisfy them with his Neoclassical themes.

During his two return trips to Italy, he visited Northern Italy, Venice, and again the Roman countryside. In 1835, Corot created a sensation at the Salon with his biblical painting Agar dans le desert (Hagar in the Wilderness), which depicted Hagar, Sarah's handmaiden, and the child Ishmael, dying of thirst in the desert until saved by an angel. The background was likely derived from an Italian study. This time, Corot's unanticipated bold, fresh statement of the Neoclassical ideal succeeded with the critics by demonstrating "the harmony between the setting and the passion or suffering that the painter chooses to depict in it." He followed that up with other biblical and mythological subjects, but those paintings did not succeed as well, as the Salon critics found him wanting in comparisons with Poussin. In 1837, he painted his earliest surviving nude, The Nymph of the Seine. Later, he advised his students "The study of the nude, you see, is the best lesson that a landscape painter can have. If someone knows how, without any tricks, to get down a figure, he is able to make a landscape; otherwise he can never do it."

Through the 1840s, Corot continued to have his troubles with the critics (many of his works were flatly rejected for Salon exhibition), nor were many works purchased by the public. While recognition and acceptance by the establishment came slowly, by 1845 Baudelaire led a charge pronouncing Corot the leader in the "modern school of landscape painting". While some critics found Corot's colors "pale" and his work having "naive awkwardness", Baudelaire astutely responded, "M. Corot is more a harmonist than a colorist, and his compositions, which are always entirely free of pedantry, are seductive just because of their simplicity of color." In 1846, the French government decorated him with the cross of the Légion d'honneur and in 1848 he was awarded a second-class medal at the Salon, but he received little state patronage as a result. His only commissioned work was a religious painting for a baptismal chapel painted in 1847, in the manner of the Renaissance masters. Though the establishment kept holding back, other painters acknowledged Corot's growing stature. In 1847, Delacroix noted in his journal, "Corot is a true artist. One has to see a painter in his own place to get an idea of his worth…Corot delves deeply into a subject: ideas come to him and he adds while working; it's the right approach." Upon Delacroix's recommendation, the painter Constant Dutilleux bought a Corot painting and began a long and rewarding relationship with the artist, bringing him friendship and patrons. Corot's public treatment dramatically improved after the Revolution of 1848, when he was admitted as a member of the Salon jury. He was promoted to an officer of the Salon in 1867.

By the mid-1850s, Corot's increasingly impressionistic style began to get the recognition that fixed his place in French art. "M. Corot excels…in reproducing vegetation in its fresh beginnings; he marvelously renders the firstlings of the new world." From the 1850s on, Corot painted many landscape souvenirs and paysages, dreamy imagined paintings of remembered locations from earlier visits painted with lightly and loosely dabbed strokes.

In the 1860s, Corot was still mixing peasant figures with mythological ones, mixing Neoclassicism with Realism, causing one critic to lament, "If M. Corot would kill, once and for all, the nymphs of his woods and replace them with peasants, I should like him beyond measure." In reality, in later life his human figures did increase and the nymphs did decrease, but even the human figures were often set in idyllic reveries.

In his aversion to shocking color, Corot sharply diverged from the up-and-coming Impressionists, who embraced experimentation with vivid hues.

The works of Corot are housed in museums in France and the Netherlands, Britain and America.

[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 16Ko]

Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (July 17, 1796 – February 22, 1875) was a French landscape painter and printmaker in etching. Corot was the leading painter of the Barbizon school of France in the mid-nineteenth century. He is a pivotal figure in landscape painting and his vast output simultaneously references the Neo-Classical tradition and anticipates the plein-air innovations of Impressionism.

 Biography
 
Woman with a Pearl, 1868-70, Paris: Musée du Louvre. Early life and training
Camille Corot was born in Paris in 1796, in a house at 125 Rue du Bac, now demolished. His family were bourgeois people—his father was a wigmaker and his mother a milliner—and unlike the experience of some of his artistic colleagues, throughout his life he never felt the want of money, as his parents made good investments and ran their businesses well. After his parents married, they bought the millinery shop where she had worked and he gave up his career as a wigmaker to run the business side of the shop. The store was a famous destination for fashionable Parisians and earned the family an excellent income. Corot was the middle of three children born to the family, who lived above their shop during those years.


Corot received a scholarship to study in Rouen, but left after having scholastic difficulties and entered a boarding school. He “was not a brilliant student, and throughout his entire school career he did not get a single nomination for a prize, not even for the drawing classes.” Unlike many masters who demonstrated early talent and inclinations toward art, before 1815 Corot showed no such interest. During those years he lived with the Sennegon family, whose patriarch was a friend of Corot’s father and who spent much time with young Corot on nature walks. It was in this region that Corot made his first paintings after nature. At nineteen, Corot was a “big child, shy and awkward. He blushed when spoken to. Before the beautiful ladies who frequented his mother’s salon, he was embarrassed and fled like a wild thing…Emotionally, he was an affectionate and well-behaved son, who adored his mother and trembled when his father spoke.” When Corot’s parents moved into a new residence in 1817, the twenty-one year old Corot moved into the dormer-windowed room on the third floor, which became his first studio as well.

With his father’s help he apprenticed to a draper, but he hated commercial life and despised what he called "business tricks”, yet he faithfully remained in the trade until he was 26, when his father consented to his adopting the profession of art. Later Corot stated, “I told my father that business and I were simply incompatible, and that I was getting a divorce.” The business experience proved beneficial, however, by helping him develop an aesthetic sense through his exposure to the colors and textures of the fabrics. Perhaps out of boredom, he turned to oil painting around 1821 and began immediately with landscapes. Starting in 1822 after the death of his sister, Corot began receiving a yearly allowance of 1500 francs which adequately financed his new career, studio, materials, and travel for the rest of his life. He immediately rented a studio on quai Voltaire.


During the period when Corot acquired the means to devote himself to art, landscape painting was on the upswing and generally divided into two camps: one?historical landscape by Neoclassicists in Southern Europe representing idealized views of real and fancied sites peopled with ancient, mythological, and biblical figures; and two?realistic landscape, more common in Northern Europe, which was largely faithful to actual topography, architecture, and flora, and which often showed figures of peasants. In both approaches, landscape artists would typically begin with outdoor sketching and preliminary painting, with finishing work done indoors. Highly influential upon French landscape artists in the early 19th century was the work of Englishmen John Constable and J.M.W. Turner, who reinforced the trend in favor of Realism and away from Neoclassicism.


For a short period between 1821–1822, Corot studied with Achille-Etna Michallon, a landscape painter of Corot’s age who was a protégé of the painter David and who was already a well-respected teacher. Michallon had a great influence on Corot’s career. Corot’s drawing lessons included tracing lithographs, copying three-dimensional forms, and making landscape sketches and paintings outdoors, especially in the forests of Fontainebleau, the seaports along Normandy, and the villages west of Paris such as Ville-d’Avray (where his parents had a country house). Michallon also exposed him to the principles of the French Neoclassic tradition, as espoused in the famous treatise of theorist Pierre-Henri de Valenciennes, and exemplified in the works of French Neoclassicists Claude Lorrain and Nicolas Poussin, whose major aim was the representation of ideal Beauty in nature, linked with events in ancient times.


Though this school was on the decline, it still held sway in the Salon, the foremost art exhibition in France attended by thousands at each event. Corot later stated, “I made my first landscape from nature…under the eye of this painter, whose only advice was to render with the greatest scrupulousness everything I saw before me. The lesson worked; since then I have always treasured precision.” After Michallon’s early death in 1822, Corot studied with Michallon’s teacher, Jean-Victor Bertin, among the best known Neoclassic landscape painters in France, who had Corot draw copies of lithographs of botanical subjects to learn precise organic forms. Though holding Neoclassicists in the highest regard, Corot did not limit his training to their tradition of allegory set in imagined nature. His notebooks reveal precise renderings of tree trunks, rocks, and plants which show the influence of Northern realism. Throughout his career, Corot demonstrated an inclination to apply both traditions in his work, sometimes combining the two.

[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 8Ko]
Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, né le 16 juillet 1796 à Paris et mort dans le 10e arrondissement de Paris, au 56 de la rue du Faubourg-Poissonnière, le 22 février 1875, est un peintre français. Il passa longtemps pour être un peintre amateur qui avait tout loisir de voyager non seulement un peu partout en France, mais aussi en Italie, où il résida à t...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 12Ko]
Jean-Baptiste Corot ou Camille Corot, né le 17 juillet 1796 à Paris et mort à Ville-d'Avray le 22 février 1875, est un peintre français. Il passa longtemps pour être un peintre amateur qui avait tout loisir à voyager non seulement un peu partout en France mais aussi en Italie, où il résida à trois reprises. Au cours de toutes ses pérégrinations, il...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 5Ko]
Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (* 16. Juli 1796 in Paris † 22. Februar 1875 ebenda) war ein bedeutender französischer Landschaftsmaler. Er ist einer der Hauptvertreter der Schule von Barbizon. Camille Corot stammte aus gutbürgerlichen Verhältnissen. Seine Mutter war eine erfolgreiche Modistin. In Paris geboren, lebte er zunächst bei einer Amme auf de...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 4Ko]
Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (Parigi, 26 luglio 1796 – Ville-d'Avray, 22 febbraio 1875) è stato un pittore francese di paesaggi. Corot lavorò con lo stile dei realisti e dei romantici del suo tempo. Tra i pittori classificati nelle scuola di Barbizon, l'arte di Corot è più individuale di quella di Rousseau, le cui opere sono più rigorosamente tradiz...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 6Ko]
Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (París, 16 de julio de 1796 – ibídem, 22 de febrero de 1875) fue un pintor francés de paisajes, uno de los más ilustres de dicho género y cuya influencia llegó al impresionismo. Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot nació en París, en una casa desde la que se tenía una perspectiva del palacio de las Tullerías, el Sena y El Louvre....
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 9Ko]
Жан Батист Камиль Коро (фр. Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, 17 июля 1796, Париж — 22 февраля 1875, там же) — французский художник и гравёр, один из самых успешных и плодовитых пейзажистов эпохи романтизма, оказавший влияние на импрессионистов. Зарисовки и эскизы Коро ценятся почти столь же высоко, как и законченные картины. Цветовая гамма Коро основан...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 5Ko]
讓-巴蒂斯·卡米耶·柯洛(Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot,1796年7月16日-1875年2月22日),法國著名的巴比松派畫家,也被譽為19世紀最出色的抒情風景畫家。畫風自然,樸素,充滿迷矇的空間感。 柯洛的一生都住在巴黎,到26歲才從商人轉為畫家,曾在畫家米謝隆與柏坦的畫室中學畫,相當喜愛寫生與旅遊,追循著他的畫,可說踏遍了全法國,以及英國、荷蘭、瑞士及義大利鄉間等地。從柯洛的畫中尤其可看出他很喜歡義大利田野風景。然而柯洛也很擅於畫肖像畫,歐洲就有不少博物館也收藏了他的肖像畫。 柯洛從1825年開始旅行,並一路素描和油畫寫生他所看到的風景,初期他的風格並不明顯,最多只是畫面的明度較高,自然光線較為具體,但到了1850年代,經過了25年的訓練,柯洛在54歲時發展出他獨...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 2Ko]
Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (Paris, 16 de Julho de 1796 – Ville-d'Avray, 22 de Fevereiro de 1875) foi um pintor realista francês. Filho de uma família de comerciantes abastados, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, teve uma infâcia confortável e estável, tendo trabalhado numa loja do pai. Corot fez seus estudos na cidade de Rouen, onde foi hospedado pela f...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 4Ko]
p ジャン=バティスト・カミーユ・コロー(Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, 1796年7月17日 - 1875年2月22日)は、19世紀のフランスの画家。 19世紀の4分の3を生き、次世代の印象派との橋渡しをした画家である。詩情あふれる森や湖の風景画で知られるが、『真珠の女』のような人物画にも傑作がある。1825年から計3度イタリアへ旅行し、イタリア絵画の明るい光と色彩にも影響を受けている。理想化された風景でなく、イタリアやフランス各地のありふれた風景を詩情ゆたかに描き出す手法はのちの印象派の画家たちにも影響を与えた。 1796年、パリの裕福な織物商人の子として生まれる。学生時代はルーアン(ノルマンディー地方)及びポワシー(パリ近郊)の寄宿学校で学んだ。コローは、画家...
[Biography - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot - 3Ko]

 

 

WahooArt.com - Jean Baptiste Camille Corot
Arts & Entertainment > Hobbies & Creative Arts > Artwork
A-7Z4Q98----EN-
Mill at Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras, Oil by Jean Baptiste Camille Corot (1796-1875, France)
/Art.nsf/O/7Z4Q98/$File/Jean-Baptiste-Corot-Mill-at-Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras.JPG
Mill at Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras (1874) Oil on canvas This painting from the late period of the artist was painted in northern France when he was a guest at the house of his friend, Robaut, not far from Arras. The painting (65 x 81 cm) is now in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay, Paris.
Jean Baptiste Camille Corot
Oil
Oil
-- -- -- -- -- -