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Dolomite Landscape, Oil On Canvas by Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980, Austria)

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Framed Giclee Fine Art Oskar Kokoschka , Oil Painting Fine Art Oskar Kokoschka
Dolomite Landscape, Oil On Canvas by Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980, Austria)
Framed Print Fine Art Oskar Kokoschka , Framed Giclee Fine Art Oskar Kokoschka

"Dolomite Landscape"

Oskar Kokoschka - Oil On Canvas - 82 x 119 cm - 1913 - (Leopold Museum (Vienna, Austria))

On her journey with Oskar Kokoschka in August of 1913, Kokoschka’s then-lover Alma Mahler wrote in her diary: “In Tre Croci, our life revolved entirely around his work. ... The summer sun above the glaciers! This morning, I couldn’t shake off the feeling that I simply do not deserve this blessing. Kokoschka needs to work! This is what he was born for. Life as such doesn’t interest him one bit…”
The landscape depicted in this painting has an enchanted appearance. The predominantly green colouration, the rugged, dark contours and the mysterious quality of the lighting situation all support this impression. The sketches for this painting bear the subtitle After the Storm. Although Alma Mahler is not actually visible in this landscape, she is somehow present all the same. The stylistic climax of the phase during which Kokoschka painted the Dolomite Landscape was reached the 1914 painting of The Bride of the Wind (also known as The Tempest), which can be seen today at the art museum Kunstmuseum Basel. In that painting, Alma Mahler and Oskar Kokoschka lie gently cuddled up to one another before a landscape which corresponds exactly to the Dolomite landscape shown in the Leopold Museum’s painting. Elisabeth Leopold, the wife of museum founder Rudolf Leopold, quite fittingly characterizes this painting—one of her favourites—as “a symphony in green”.



 
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Oskar Kokoschka (1 March 1886 – 22 February 1980) was an Austrian artist, poet and playwright best known for his intense expressionistic portraits and landscapes.

He was born in Pöchlarn, second child to Gustav and Romana Kokoschka. His older brother died in infancy in 1887; he had a sister, Berta (born in 1889) and a brother, Bohuslav (born in 1892). Oskar had a strong belief in omens, spurred by a story of a fire breaking out in Pöchlarn shortly after his mother gave birth to him. Kokoschka's life was not easy mainly due to a lack of financial help from his father. They constantly moved into smaller flats, farther and farther from the thriving center of the town. Concluding that his father was inadequate, Kokoschka drew closer to his mother; he felt that he was the head of the household and continued to support his family when he gained wealth. Kokoschka entered secondary school at Realschule, where emphasis was placed on the study of modern subjects such as science and language. Kokoschka was not interested in his subjects, as he found he only excelled in art, and spent most of his time reading classic literature during his lessons. This education of classic literature is said to have influenced his artwork.

One of Kokoschka's professors suggested he pursue a career in fine art. Against his father's will, Kokoschka applied to Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Arts and Crafts) in Vienna, where he was one of three accepted out of 153 applicants. Kunstgewerbeschule was an extremely progressive school that focused mainly on architecture, furniture, crafts and modern design. Unlike the more prestigious and traditional Academy of Fine Art in Vienna, Kunstgewerbeschule was dominated by instructors of the Vienna Secession. Kokoschka studied there from 1904 to 1909, and was influenced by his professor Carl Otto Czeschka in developing an original style.

Among Kokoschka's early works were gesture drawings of children, which portrayed them as awkward and corpse-like. Kokoschka had no formal training in painting and so approached the medium without regard to the "traditional" or "correct" way to paint. The teachers at Kunstgewerbeschule helped Kokoschka gain opportunities through the Wiener Werkstätte or Viennese Workshops. Kokoschka's first commissions were postcards and drawings for children. Kokoschka said that it gave him "the basis of [his] artistic training". His early career was marked by portraits of Viennese celebrities, painted in a nervously animated style.

Kokoschka had a passionate, often stormy affair with Alma Mahler. It began in 1912, shortly after the death of her four-year-old daughter Maria Mahler and her affair with Walter Gropius. After several years together, Alma rejected him, explaining that she was afraid of being too overcome with passion. He continued to love her his entire life, and one of his greatest works, The Bride of the Wind (The Tempest), is a tribute to her. The poet Georg Trakl visited the studio while Kokoschka was painting this masterpiece. Kokoschka's poem Allos Markar was inspired by this relationship.

He volunteered for service as a cavalryman in the Austrian army in World War I, and in 1915 was seriously wounded. At the hospital, the doctors decided that he was mentally unstable. Nevertheless, he continued to develop his career as an artist, traveling across Europe and painting the landscape.

He commissioned a life-sized female doll in 1918. Although intended to simulate Alma and receive his affection, the gynoid-Alma did not satisfy Kokoschka and he destroyed it during a party.

Deemed a degenerate by the Nazis, Kokoschka fled Austria in 1934 for Prague. In Prague his name was adopted by a group of other expatriate artists, the Oskar-Kokoschka-Bund (OKB), though he declined to otherwise participate. In 1938, when the Czechs began to mobilize for the expected invasion of the Wehrmacht, he fled to the United Kingdom and remained there during the war. With the help of the British Committee for Refugees from Czechoslovakia (later the Czech Refugee Trust Fund), all members of the OKB were able to escape through Poland and Sweden.

During World War II, Oskar Kokoschka and his wife lived in Ullapool, a village along the Wester Ross of Scotland for several summer months. There he drew with colored pencil (a technique he developed in Scotland), and painted many local landscape views in watercolour.

Kokoschka became a British citizen in 1946 and only in 1978 would regain Austrian citizenship. He traveled briefly to the United States in 1947 before settling in Switzerland, where he lived the rest of his life. Kokoschka's last years were somewhat embittered, as he found himself marginalized as a curious footnote to art history. He died in Montreux on 22 February 1980.

Kokoschka had much in common with his contemporary Max Beckmann. Both maintained their independence from German Expressionism, yet they are now regarded as its supreme masters, who delved deeply into the art of past masters to develop unique individual styles. Their individualism left them both orphaned from the main movements of Twentieth Century modernism. Both wrote eloquently of the need to develop the art of "seeing" (Kokoschka emphasized depth perception while Beckmann was concerned with mystical insight into the invisible realm), and both were masters of innovative oil painting techniques anchored in earlier traditions.

Kokoschka's literary works are as peculiar and interesting as his art. His memoir, A Sea Ringed with Visions, is as wildly psychedelic as anything written by others under the influence of actual hallucinogens.[citation needed] His short play "Murderer, the Hope of Women" (1909, set ten years later by Paul Hindemith as Mörder, Hoffnung der Frauen) is often called the first Expressionist drama. His Orpheus und Eurydike (1918) became an opera by Ernst Krenek, who was first approached for incidental music.

[Biography - Oskar Kokoschka - 7Ko]
Oskar Kokoschka, né le 1er mars 1886 à Pöchlarn, en Autriche, et décédé le 22 février 1980 à Montreux, en Suisse, est un écrivain et peintre expressionniste autrichien. De 1905 à 1909, Kokoschka suit les cours de la Kunstgewerbeschule de Vienne. L'un de ses professeurs est Gustav Klimt et l'une de ses condisciples Elsa Oeltjen-Kasimir. Kokoschka re...
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Oskar Kokoschka (* 1. März 1886 in Pöchlarn, Niederösterreich † 22. Februar 1980 in Montreux, Schweiz), war ein österreichischer Maler, Grafiker und Schriftsteller des Expressionismus und der Wiener Moderne. Oskar Kokoschka wurde geboren als zweiter Sohn des Handelsreisenden Gustav Josef Kokoschka (1840–1923) und dessen Ehefrau Maria Romana, geb. ...
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Oskar Kokoschka (Pöchlarn, 1º marzo 1886 – Montreux, 22 febbraio 1980) è stato un pittore e drammaturgo austriaco. Oskar Kokoschka nacque a Pöchlarn, cittadina della Bassa Austria, il 1º marzo 1886. Studiò dapprima chimica, poi dal 1903 al 1909 frequentò l’Accademia di belle arti di Vienna, dove fu attratto dalle opere barocche di Franz Anton Maulb...
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Oskar Kokoschka (1 de marzo de 1886 - 22 de febrero de 1980) fue un pintor y poeta de origen austríaco, conocido principalmente por sus retratos y paisajes expresionistas. Oskar Kokoschka nació el 1 de marzo del año 1886 en el seno de una humilde familia dedicada al arte de la orfebrería, que residía en la pequeña localidad austríaca de Pöchlarn, s...
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О́скар Кокошка (нем. Oskar Kokoschka, 1 марта 1886, Пёхларн, Австро-Венгрия — 22 февраля 1980, Вильнёв, Швейцария) — австрийский художник и писатель чешского происхождения, крупнейшая фигура австрийского экспрессионизма. По отцу принадлежал к роду известных пражских ювелиров. В 1903—1909 учился в Венской школе искусств и ремёсел, среди его преподав...
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奥斯卡·柯克西卡 (1886年3月1日-1980年2月22日)是奥地利 表现主义画家、诗人兼剧作家。 柯克西卡出生于奥地利东北的包克兰,捷克族人,当他三岁时,他的父亲破产,全家迁居到维也纳,父亲找了一分旅游推销工作。1891年, 他的长兄去世。他小时作为教堂唱诗班成员,最早接触艺术是被教堂的镶嵌彩色玻璃窗和巴洛克风格的壁画吸引。18岁时,获得维也纳工艺美术学校的奖学金入学,很快获得一份夜校助教的职位,白天上学夜晚教学,他学习了绘画、作石板画印刷和书籍装帧等工艺,1907年,他成为维也纳工艺画室成员并接受委托。 但柯克西卡钟情于描画人物和创作大型作品,他在夜校雇佣人体模特,在自己的工艺作品中也加入人像因素,自己自学油画技法,但仍然需要用工艺工作维持生活来源。 1908年,他遇到维也纳著名建筑师...
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Oskar Kokoschka (Pöchlarn(Áustria), 1 de Março de 1886 — Villeneuve (Suíça), 22 de Fevereiro de 1980) foi um pintor expressionista e escritor austríaco. Kokoschka, nascido no Império Áustro-Húngaro, filho de um ourives, foi um pintor austriaco. De 1905 à 1909, Kokoschka assiste aos cursos da Kunstgewerbeschule de Vienne. Um dos seus professores é G...
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オスカー・ココシュカ(Oskar Kokoschka, 1886年3月1日 - 1980年2月22日)は、20世紀のオーストリアの画家。 クリムト、シーレと並び、近代オーストリアを代表する画家の一人である。表現主義に分類されることが多いが、ココシュカ自身はウィーン分離派、「青騎士」、「ブリュッケ」などの当時の芸術運動やグループには参加せず、終始独自の道を歩んだ。 ココシュカは少年時代をウィーンで過ごし、ウィーンの工芸学校で学んだ。20歳代には、建築家ヨーゼフ・ホフマンの主宰した「ウィーン工房」に参加し、装飾美術の仕事をしている。また、挿絵入り詩集を発表し、当初は画家というよりは詩人、装飾美術家として知られていた。 1910年、表現主義の雑誌『シュトルム』(嵐)の発行人であり、同名の画廊の経営...
[Biography - Oskar Kokoschka - 2Ko]

 

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A-8XX9FA----EN-
Dolomite Landscape, Oil On Canvas by Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980, Austria)
/Art.nsf/O/8XX9FA/$File/Oskar-Kokoschka-Dolomite-Landscape.JPG
On her journey with Oskar Kokoschka in August of 1913, Kokoschka’s then-lover Alma Mahler wrote in her diary: “In Tre Croci, our life revolved entirely around his work. ... The summer sun above the glaciers! This morning, I couldn’t shake off the feeling that I simply do not deserve this blessing. Kokoschka needs to work! This is what he was born for. Life as such doesn’t interest him one bit…” The landscape depicted in this painting has an enchanted appearance. The predominantly green colouration, the rugged, dark contours and the mysterious quality of the lighting situation all support this impression. The sketches for this painting bear the subtitle After the Storm. Although Alma Mahler is not actually visible in this landscape, she is somehow present all the same. The stylistic climax of the phase during which Kokoschka painted the Dolomite Landscape was reached the 1914 painting of The Bride of the Wind (also known as The Tempest), which can be seen today at the art museum Kunstmuseum Basel. In that painting, Alma Mahler and Oskar Kokoschka lie gently cuddled up to one another before a landscape which corresponds exactly to the Dolomite landscape shown in the Leopold Museum’s painting. Elisabeth Leopold, the wife of museum founder Rudolf Leopold, quite fittingly characterizes this painting—one of her favourites—as “a symphony in green”.
Oskar Kokoschka
Oil On Canvas
Oil On Canvas
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