+ 1 (707) 877-4321
+ 33 977-198-888
English
Français
Deutsch
Italiano
Español
Русский
中国
Português
日本

Seated Woman II, 1938 by Joan Miro (1893-1983, Spain)

Raphael Birthday, 30% off sitewide! Valid:28/03/2017

FREE Shipping. FREE Returns All the time. See details.

Framed Print Fine Art Seated Woman Ii - 1938 By Joan Miro , Framed Print Fine Art Seated Woman Ii - 1938 By Joan Miro
Seated Woman II, 1938 by Joan Miro (1893-1983, Spain)
Framed Print Fine Art Seated Woman Ii - 1938 By Joan Miro , Framed Print Fine Art Seated Woman Ii - 1938 By Joan Miro

"Seated Woman II"

Joan Miro - 162 x 130 cm - 1938 - (The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation (Venice, Italy))

The expressionistic Seated Woman II can be seen as a final manifestation of Joan Miró’s peintures sauvages, works characterized by violence of execution and imagery. It was painted at a time when Miró, like Pablo Picasso and Julio González, was responding acutely to the events of the Spanish Civil War.
The human figure has been transmogrified here into a grotesque and bestial creature. However, the aggressiveness of imagery and formal elements coexists with fanciful details and cosmic implications. Though the open, saw-toothed mouth imparts a sense of the woman’s voraciousness or anguish, her bottle-breast implies her generative force. Her expansive torso constitutes an impenetrable ground, its horizon line described by her squared shoulders, out of which grow the vegetative stems of arms and neck. The bird and fish forms floating through the atmosphere become insignias for air and water, while the moon, star, and planet emblems on the woman’s collar broaden the associations to encompass the astral plane. The remaining abstract shapes seem to course slowly in mysterious orbits, passing through and beyond one another, changing color where they intersect. A cohesive universe is created despite the dichotomies of light and dark, nurture and destruction, life and nonexistence. Integration is provided by the repetition of shapes, such as the leaf and oval, which suggests analogies: the woman’s pendant becomes a moon or vagina, her hair resembles lines of sight, like those of the fish, or rays of light, and her teeth are equated with the decorative motifs or mountains in the miniature landscape of her collar.
This work postdates by about two months the more generalized Seated Woman I (Collection The Museum of Modern Art, New York).



 
Giclee Print on canvas   Reproduction
Buy a giclée print of this artwork of Joan Miro Do you want to buy a giclee print on cotton canvas of this artwork from Joan Miro ?
WahooArt.com use only the most modern and efficient printing technology on our 100% cotton canvases 400gsm, based on the Giclée printing procedure. This innovative high resolution printing technique results in durable and spectacular looking prints of the highest quality.
Do not hesitate order your print now !


  Buy a Joan Miro hand made copy For just a little more than a print you can have a hand made reproduction of a painting of Joan Miro.
With our talented oil painters, we offer 100% hand made oil paintings on various subjects and styles.
Click here to buy a hand made oil reproduction of this Joan Miro Artwork


Loading Joan Miro biography....

 

 

WahooArt.com - Joan Miro
Arts & Entertainment > Hobbies & Creative Arts > Artwork
A-8XYBXG----EN-
Seated Woman II, 1938 by Joan Miro (1893-1983, Spain)
/Art.nsf/O/8XYBXG/$File/Joan-Miro-Seated-Woman-II.JPG
The expressionistic Seated Woman II can be seen as a final manifestation of Joan Miró’s peintures sauvages, works characterized by violence of execution and imagery. It was painted at a time when Miró, like Pablo Picasso and Julio González, was responding acutely to the events of the Spanish Civil War. The human figure has been transmogrified here into a grotesque and bestial creature. However, the aggressiveness of imagery and formal elements coexists with fanciful details and cosmic implications. Though the open, saw-toothed mouth imparts a sense of the woman’s voraciousness or anguish, her bottle-breast implies her generative force. Her expansive torso constitutes an impenetrable ground, its horizon line described by her squared shoulders, out of which grow the vegetative stems of arms and neck. The bird and fish forms floating through the atmosphere become insignias for air and water, while the moon, star, and planet emblems on the woman’s collar broaden the associations to encompass the astral plane. The remaining abstract shapes seem to course slowly in mysterious orbits, passing through and beyond one another, changing color where they intersect. A cohesive universe is created despite the dichotomies of light and dark, nurture and destruction, life and nonexistence. Integration is provided by the repetition of shapes, such as the leaf and oval, which suggests analogies: the woman’s pendant becomes a moon or vagina, her hair resembles lines of sight, like those of the fish, or rays of light, and her teeth are equated with the decorative motifs or mountains in the miniature landscape of her collar. This work postdates by about two months the more generalized Seated Woman I (Collection The Museum of Modern Art, New York).
Joan Miro
-- -- -- -- -- -