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BLUE I, 1961 by Joan Miro (1893-1937, Spain)

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Oil Painting Fine Art Blue I - 1961 By Joan Miro , Oil Painting Fine Art Blue I - 1961 By Joan Miro
BLUE I, 1961 by Joan Miro (1893-1937, Spain)
Oil Painting Fine Art Blue I - 1961 By Joan Miro , Oil Painting Fine Art Blue I - 1961 By Joan Miro

"BLUE I"

Joan Miro - 1961 - (Centre Pompidou (Paris, France))

Blue I, II, III is a triptych created in 1961. It is a set of three-part display abstract oil painting by the Spanish modern artist Joan Miró. The paintings are named Blue I, Blue II, Blue III and are very similar. All three are enormous painting 355 cm x 270 cm each and currently owned by the Musée National d'Art Moderne in the Centre Pompidou in Paris.
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In 1961, after three trips to the United States and exhibitions at the Galerie Maeght in Paris and Pierre Matisse Gallery in New York, Miro began further purifying the deepening his earlier discoveries. This development had been heralded by Blue I, II, III. It reflects, above all, the supreme confidence the artist had attained in composing and coloring his paintings. The style is unmistakable. Miro was playing with codes that describe the movement of objects in a uniquely simple way. For example, a certain trajectory might be represented by a line, generally a thin one, ending in a dot or in a pair of parentheses. This latter symbol was often used by Miro as a kind o container, to keep energy from escaping. What is more, they look in two different directions, referring back to Miro's last pictures of the 1950s - full of sudden movements and primaeval symbols - while at the same time looking forward to a completely new artistic freedom, a spontaneous attitude towards the material and colours, in a hitherto unprecedented way.



 
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BLUE I, 1961 by Joan Miro (1893-1937, Spain)
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Blue I, II, III is a triptych created in 1961. It is a set of three-part display abstract oil painting by the Spanish modern artist Joan Miró. The paintings are named Blue I, Blue II, Blue III and are very similar. All three are enormous painting 355 cm x 270 cm each and currently owned by the Musée National d'Art Moderne in the Centre Pompidou in Paris. . In 1961, after three trips to the United States and exhibitions at the Galerie Maeght in Paris and Pierre Matisse Gallery in New York, Miro began further purifying the deepening his earlier discoveries. This development had been heralded by Blue I, II, III. It reflects, above all, the supreme confidence the artist had attained in composing and coloring his paintings. The style is unmistakable. Miro was playing with codes that describe the movement of objects in a uniquely simple way. For example, a certain trajectory might be represented by a line, generally a thin one, ending in a dot or in a pair of parentheses. This latter symbol was often used by Miro as a kind o container, to keep energy from escaping. What is more, they look in two different directions, referring back to Miro's last pictures of the 1950s - full of sudden movements and primaeval symbols - while at the same time looking forward to a completely new artistic freedom, a spontaneous attitude towards the material and colours, in a hitherto unprecedented way.
Joan Miro
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