+ 1 (707) 877-4321
+ 33 977-198-888
English
Français
Deutsch
Italiano
Español
Русский
中国
Português
日本

"Castelfranco Madonna", Oil by Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli (1477-1510, Italy)

FREE Shipping. FREE Returns All the time. See details.

High Renaissance Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli , Oil Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli
'Castelfranco Madonna', Oil by Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli (1477-1510, Italy)
High Renaissance Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli , Oil Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli

Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli - Oil

The altar-piece, called the Castelfranco Madonna, was in all probability commissioned by the Condottiere Tuzio Costanzo in memory of his son Matteo, who died in 1504: the Costanzo coat of arms can be seen on the base of the Virgin's throne. It can almost certainly be dated to 1505. Although it is not signed, the authorship is made indisputable by Giorgione's individual technique in laying on delicately shaded coats of paint without any underlying scaffolding from a drawing. The traditional scheme of composition is lightened by the novel use of such elements as the throne and the landscape, which takes up a good portion of the background. This smallish altarpiece echoes the artistic approach developed by Giovanni Bellini, who was probably one of Giorgione's teachers. Giorgione softens both the atmosphere surrounding the figures and that in the space before the viewer. This atmospheric veil has a palpable analogy with the methods of Leonardo da Vinci, who was known to have been in Venice in 1500 and it is possible that Giorgione had seen some works by the Florentine genius. Yet the figural proportions and the lacy landscape speak to a fully personal Giorgionesque idiom.



 
Giclee Print on canvas   Reproduction
Buy a giclée print of this artwork of Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli Do you want to buy a giclee print on cotton canvas of this artwork from Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli ?
WahooArt.com use only the most modern and efficient printing technology on our 100% cotton canvases 400gsm, based on the Giclée printing procedure. This innovative high resolution printing technique results in durable and spectacular looking prints of the highest quality.
Do not hesitate order your print now !


  Buy a Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli hand made copy For just a little more than a print you can have a hand made reproduction of a painting of Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli.
With our talented oil painters, we offer 100% hand made oil paintings on various subjects and styles.
Click here to buy a hand made oil reproduction of this Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli Artwork

Giorgione (born Giorgio Barbarelli da Castelfranco; c. 1477/8 – 1510 ) was an Italian painter of the High Renaissance in Venice. Giorgione is known for the elusive poetic quality of his work, though only about six surviving paintings are acknowledged for certain to be his work. The resulting uncertainty about the identity and meaning of his art has made Giorgione one of the most mysterious figures in European painting.


The little known of Giorgione's life is given in Giorgio Vasari's Vite. The painter came from the small town of Castelfranco Veneto, 40 km inland from Venice. His name sometimes appears as Zorzo. The variant Giorgione (or Zorzon) may be translated "Big George". How early in boyhood he went to Venice we do not know, but stylistic evidence supports the statement of Carlo Ridolfi that he served his apprenticeship there under Giovanni Bellini; there he settled and made his fame.


Contemporary documents record that his gifts were recognized early. In 1500, when he was only twenty-three (that is, if Vasari is correct about his age when he died), he was chosen to paint portraits of the Doge Agostino Barbarigo and the condottiere Consalvo Ferrante. In 1504 he was commissioned to paint an altarpiece in memory of another condottiere, Matteo Costanzo, in the cathedral of his native town, Castelfranco. In 1507 he received at the order of the Council of Ten part payment for a picture (subject not mentioned) on which he was engaged for the Hall of the Audience in the Doge's Palace. In 1507-1508 he was employed, with other artists of his generation, to decorate with frescoes the exterior of the newly rebuilt Fondaco dei Tedeschi (or German Merchants' Hall) at Venice, having already done similar work on the exterior of the Casa Soranzo, the Casa Grimani alli Servi and other Venetian palaces. Very little of this work survives today.


Vasari mentions an important event in Giorgione's life, and one which had influence on his work, his meeting with Leonardo da Vinci on the occasion of the Tuscan master's visit to Venice in 1500. All accounts agree in representing Giorgione as a person of distinguished and romantic charm, a great lover and a musician, given to express in his art the sensuous and imaginative grace, touched with poetic melancholy, of the Venetian existence of his time. They represent him further as having made in Venetian painting an advance analogous to that made in Tuscan painting by Leonardo more than twenty years before; that is, as having released the art from the last shackles of archaic rigidity and placed it in possession of full freedom and the full mastery of its means.
He was very closely associated with Titian; Vasari says Giorgione was Titian's master, while Ridolfi says they both were pupils of Bellini, and lived in his house. They worked together on the Fondaco dei Tedeschi frescoes, and Titian finished at least some paintings of Giorgione after his death, although which ones remains very controversial.


Giorgione also introduced a new range of subjects. Besides altarpieces and portraits he painted pictures that told no story, whether biblical or classical, or if they professed to tell a story, neglected the action and simply embodied in form and color moods of lyrical or romantic feeling, much as a musician might embody them in sounds. Innovating with the courage and felicity of genius, he had for a time an overwhelming influence on his contemporaries and immediate successors in the Venetian school, including Titian, Sebastiano del Piombo, Palma il Vecchio, il Cariani, Giulio Campagnola (and his brother), and even on his already eminent master, Giovanni Bellini. In the Venetian mainland, Giorgionismo strongly influenced Morto da Feltre, Domenico Capriolo, and Domenico Mancini.


Giorgione died, probably of the plague then raging, by October, 1510. October of 1510 is also the date of a letter by Isabella d'Este to a Venetian friend; asking him to buy a painting by Giorgione; in the letter she is aware he is already dead. Significantly, the reply a month later said the painting was not to be had at any price.


His name and work continue to exercise a spell on posterity. But to identify and define, among the relics of his age and school, precisely what that work is, and to distinguish it from the similar work of other men whom his influence inspired, is a very difficult matter. Though there are no longer any supporters of the "Pan Giorgionismus"which a century ago claimed for Giorgione nearly every painting of the time that at all resembles his manner, there are still, as then, exclusive critics who reduce to half a dozen the list of extant pictures which they will admit to be actually by this master.
For his home town of Castelfranco, Giorgione painted the Castelfranco Madonna, an altarpiece in sacra conversazione form — Madonna enthroned, with saints on either side forming an equilateral triangle. This gave the landscape background an importance which marks an innovation in Venetian art, and was quickly followed by his master Giovanni Bellini and others. Giorgione began to use the very refined chiaroscuro called sfumato — the delicate use of shades of color to depict light and perspective — around the same time as Leonardo. Whether Vasari is correct in saying he learned it from Leonardo's works is unclear — he is always keen to ascribe all advances to Florentine sources. Leonardo's delicate color modulations result from the tiny disconnected spots of paint that he probably derived from Illuminated manuscript techniques and first brought into oil painting. These gave Giorgione's works the magical glow of light for which they are celebrated.


Most central and typical of all of Giorgione's extant works is the Sleeping Venus now in Dresden. It was first recognized by Giovanni Morelli, and is now universally accepted, as being the same as the picture seen by Marcantonio Michiel and later by Ridolfi (his 17th century biographer) in the Casa Marcello at Venice. An exquisitely pure and severe rhythm of line and contour chastens the sensuous richness of the painting. The sweep of white drapery on which the goddess lies; and the glowing landscape that fills the space behind her; most harmoniously frame her divinity. The use of an external landscape to frame a nude is innovative; but in addition, to add to her mystery, she is shrouded in sleep, spirited away from accessibility to any conscious expression.


It is recorded by Michiel that Giorgione left this piece unfinished and that the landscape, with a Cupid which subsequent restoration has removed, were completed after his death by Titian. The picture is the prototype of Titian's own Venus of Urbino and of many more by other painters of the school; but none of them attained the fame of the first exemplar. The same concept of idealized beauty is evoked in a virginally pensive Judith from the Hermitage Museum, a large painting which exhibits Giorgione's special qualities of color richness and landscape romance, while demonstrating that life and death are each other's companions rather than foes.


Apart from the altarpiece and the frescoes, all Giorgione's surviving works are small paintings designed for the wealthy Venetian collector to keep in his home; most are under two feet (60 cm) in either dimension. This market had been emerging over the last half of the 15th century in Italy, and was much better established in the Netherlands, but Giorgione was the first major Italian painter to concentrate his work on it to such an extent — indeed soon after his death the size of paintings began to increase with the prosperity and palaces of the patrons.


The Tempest has been called the first landscape in the history of Western painting. The subject of this painting is unclear, but its artistic mastery is apparent. The Tempest portrays a soldier and a breast-feeding woman on either side of a stream, amid a city's rubble and an incoming storm. The multitude of symbols in The Tempest offer many interpretations, but none is wholly satisfying. Theories that the painting is about duality (city and country, male and female) have been dismissed since radiography has shown that in the earlier stages of the painting the soldier to the left was a seated female nude.


The Three Philosophers is equally enigmatic and its attribution to Giorgione is still disputed. The three figures stand near a dark empty cave. Sometimes interpreted as symbols of Plato's cave or the Three Magi, they seem lost in a typical Giorgionesque dreamy mood, reinforced by a hazy light characteristic of his other landscapes, such as the Pastoral Concert, now in the Louvre. The latter "reveals the Venetians' love of textures", because the painter "renders almost palpable the appearance of flesh, fabric, wood, stone, and foliage".[5] The painting is devoid of harsh contours and its treatment of landscape has been frequently compared to pastoral poetry, hence the title.


Giorgione and the young Titian revolutionized the genre of the portrait as well. It is exceedingly difficult and sometimes simply impossible to differentiate Titian's early works from those of Giorgione. None of Giorgione's paintings are signed and only one bears a reliable date:[  his portrait of Laura (1 June 1506), one of the first to be painted in the "modern manner", distinguished by dignity, clarity, and sophisticated characterization. Even more striking is the Portrait of a Young Man now in Berlin, acclaimed by art historians for "the indescribably subtle expression of serenity and the immobile features, added to the chiseled effect of the silhouette and modeling".


Few of the portraits attributed to Giorgione appear as straightforward records of the appearance of a commissioning individual, though it is perfectly possible that many are. Many can be read as types designed to express a mood or atmosphere, and certainly many of the examples of the portrait tradition Giorgione initiated appear to have had this purpose, and not to have been sold to the sitter. The subjects of his non-religious figure paintings are equally hard to discern. Perhaps the first question to ask is whether there was intended to be a specific meaning to these paintings that ingenious research can hope to recover. Many art historians argue that there is not: "The best evidence, perhaps, that Giorgione's pictures were not particularly esoteric in their meaning is provided by the fact that while his stylistic innovations were widely adopted, the distinguishing feature of virtually all Venetian non-religious painting in the first half of the 16th century is the lack of learned or literary content".

[Biography - Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli - 13Ko]
Giorgio Barbarelli ou Zorzi da Vedelago ou da Castelfranco, dit Giorgione (Vedelago ou Castelfranco Veneto 1477 - Venise 1510) est le premier grand peintre vénitien du Cinquecento italien. Ses dates de naissance et de mort ont été fournies par Vasari dans ses Vite. La date de naissance, 1477, semble vraisemblable car elle est cohérente avec l’activ...
[Biography - Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli - 5Ko]
Giorgione (* 1478 in Castelfranco Veneto &dagger vor dem 25. Oktober 1510 in Venedig vollständiger Name Giorgio da Castelfranco, auch Zorzo da Castelfranco) war ein italienischer Maler der Renaissance Gemeinsam mit Tizian lernte Giorgione in der Werkstatt von Giovanni Bellini. Die wenigen Werke, die von ihm bekannt sind, gehören zu den reinsten ...
[Biography - Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli - 4Ko]
Giorgione - pseudonimo di Giorgio o Zorzi da Castelfranco (Castelfranco Veneto, 1478 - Venezia, 1510) è stato un pittore italiano.I suoi soggetti sono svariati, ma spesso oscuri e il colore domina sul significato nascosto delle opere fantastiche. Figure e paesaggi sono armoniosamente amalgamati all'interno di una realtà dalle mille sfumature. Biogr...
[Biography - Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli - 8Ko]
Giorgio Barbarelli da Castelfranco más conocido como Giorgione, (Castelfranco Véneto h. 1477 - Venecia, 1510), pintor italiano, representante destacado de la escuela veneciana.Giorgione es conocido por la poética calidad de su trabajo y por el hecho de que se conoce con certeza la autoría de muy pocas de sus obras (aprox. 6), entre otras razones p...
[Biography - Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli - 9Ko]

 

WahooArt.com
Arts & Entertainment > Hobbies & Creative Arts > Artwork
W-BRUE-7YNCB6----EN-
"Castelfranco Madonna", Oil by Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli (1477-1510, Italy)
/A55A04/w.nsf/O/BRUE-7YNCB6/$File/Giorgione+-+Giorgio+Barbarelli+-+Castelfranco+Madonna+.JPG
The altar-piece, called the Castelfranco Madonna, was in all probability commissioned by the Condottiere Tuzio Costanzo in memory of his son Matteo, who died in 1504: the Costanzo coat of arms can be seen on the base of the Virgin's throne. It can almost certainly be dated to 1505. Although it is not signed, the authorship is made indisputable by Giorgione's individual technique in laying on delicately shaded coats of paint without any underlying scaffolding from a drawing. The traditional scheme of composition is lightened by the novel use of such elements as the throne and the landscape, which takes up a good portion of the background. This smallish altarpiece echoes the artistic approach developed by Giovanni Bellini, who was probably one of Giorgione's teachers. Giorgione softens both the atmosphere surrounding the figures and that in the space before the viewer. This atmospheric veil has a palpable analogy with the methods of Leonardo da Vinci, who was known to have been in Venice in 1500 and it is possible that Giorgione had seen some works by the Florentine genius. Yet the figural proportions and the lacy landscape speak to a fully personal Giorgionesque idiom.
Giorgione - Giorgio Barbarelli
Oil
Oil
EMAIL- EMAIL- EMAIL- EMAIL- EMAIL- EMAIL