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Museum Art Reproductions | The Feast of Belshazzar, 1635 by Rembrandt Van Rijn (1606-1669, Netherlands) | WahooArt.com

Artworks , Artworks
 Museum Art Reproductions | The Feast of Belshazzar, 1635 by Rembrandt Van Rijn (1606-1669, Netherlands) | WahooArt.com
Artworks , Artworks

"The Feast of Belshazzar"

Rembrandt Van Rijn - Oil - 1635 - (National Gallery (London, United Kingdom))

The Feast of Belshazzar is a Biblical story of Nebuchadnezzar who looted sacred artifacts from a temple in Jerusalem, including golden cups. His son Belshazzar used the cups and had a feast with the lords in his kingdom. It was here that the hand of God appeared and inscribed texts on the wall that prophesied his downfall. The feast was a lavish one but Rembrandt chooses to push his characters into a corner, cutting them off from the group, all the figures are close to the edge which increases the claustrophobic ominous atmosphere. Belshazzar stares at the wall with astonishment and fear, his hand is in the air, as if to push the hand away. The woman next to him is in a velvet vermillion gown, she leans away from the inscriptions with wine falling over the golden cup. The courtesan that sits opposite him is still, facing away from the viewer, another still figure stands in the shadows holding her recorder, a woodwind musical instrument, as she stares at the panic in front of her. These two figures emphasise the agitation within the group. The inscription, in the Biblical story, was in a language that they did not understand, it is assumed to be Aramiac, Daniel was called to translate it. In the painting, the inscription was derived from a book by his friend Menasseh ben Israel but he mistranscribed one of the characters and arranged them in columns whereas Hebrew is written from right to left.





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