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Apollo and Daphne by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | WahooArt.com

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Apollo And Daphne By John William Waterhouse , Apollo And Daphne By John William Waterhouse
  Apollo and Daphne by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | WahooArt.com
Apollo And Daphne By John William Waterhouse , Apollo And Daphne By John William Waterhouse

John William Waterhouse - Oil

Apollo and Daphne (1908) is an oil painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. In Greek mythology, Daphne was the daughter of the river god Peneius. She was similar in many ways to the goddess Artemis, in that she was also a virgin huntress who happily roamed the wilderness. One day, the love god Eros shot a flurry of arrows to taunts from Apollo, the god of prophecy. The first of Eros' arrows was a gold-tipped shaft and when it struck Apollo it made him fall immediately in love with Daphne. The second one, however, had a lead tip and caused Daphne to become even more indifferent that she already had been to any lover. Apollo, however, pursued Daphne relentlessly until, in desperation, she turned herself into a laurel tree on the banks of her father's river.





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WahooArt.com - John William Waterhouse
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Apollo and Daphne by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | WahooArt.com
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Apollo and Daphne (1908) is an oil painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. In Greek mythology, Daphne was the daughter of the river god Peneius. She was similar in many ways to the goddess Artemis, in that she was also a virgin huntress who happily roamed the wilderness. One day, the love god Eros shot a flurry of arrows to taunts from Apollo, the god of prophecy. The first of Eros' arrows was a gold-tipped shaft and when it struck Apollo it made him fall immediately in love with Daphne. The second one, however, had a lead tip and caused Daphne to become even more indifferent that she already had been to any lover. Apollo, however, pursued Daphne relentlessly until, in desperation, she turned herself into a laurel tree on the banks of her father's river.
John William Waterhouse
Oil
Oil