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Undine by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | WahooArt.com

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Undine By John William Waterhouse , Undine By John William Waterhouse
  Undine by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | WahooArt.com
Undine By John William Waterhouse , Undine By John William Waterhouse

John William Waterhouse - Oil

Undine (1872) is an oil painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. Exhibited at the Society of British Artists, 1872. Also spelled Ondine. Undine is a mythological figure of European tradition, a water nymph who becomes human when she falls in love with a man but is doomed to die if he is unfaithful to her. Derived from the Greek figures known as Nereids, attendants of the sea god Poseidon, Undine was first mentioned in the writings of the Swiss author Paracelsus, who put forth his theory that there are spirits called "undines" who inhabit the element of water. A version of the myth was adapted as the romance Undine by Baron Fouqué in 1811, and librettos based on the romance were written by E.T.A. Hoffmann in 1816 and Albert Lortzing in 1845. Maurice Maeterlinck's play Pelléas et Mélisande (1892) was in part based on this myth, as was Ondine (1939), a drama by Jean Giraudoux. The myth was also the basis of a ballet choreographed and performed by Margot Fonteyn. The word is from the Latin unda, meaning "wave" or "water."





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WahooArt.com - John William Waterhouse
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Undine by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | WahooArt.com
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Undine (1872) is an oil painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. Exhibited at the Society of British Artists, 1872. Also spelled Ondine. Undine is a mythological figure of European tradition, a water nymph who becomes human when she falls in love with a man but is doomed to die if he is unfaithful to her. Derived from the Greek figures known as Nereids, attendants of the sea god Poseidon, Undine was first mentioned in the writings of the Swiss author Paracelsus, who put forth his theory that there are spirits called "undines" who inhabit the element of water. A version of the myth was adapted as the romance Undine by Baron Fouqué in 1811, and librettos based on the romance were written by E.T.A. Hoffmann in 1816 and Albert Lortzing in 1845. Maurice Maeterlinck's play Pelléas et Mélisande (1892) was in part based on this myth, as was Ondine (1939), a drama by Jean Giraudoux. The myth was also the basis of a ballet choreographed and performed by Margot Fonteyn. The word is from the Latin unda, meaning "wave" or "water."
John William Waterhouse
Oil
Oil