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Thisbe (aka The Listener) by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | Oil Painting | WahooArt.com

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Painting Copy Thisbe , Artworks
Thisbe (aka The Listener) by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | Oil Painting | WahooArt.com

John William Waterhouse - Oil

Thisbe (aka The Listener) (1909) is an oil painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. Also known as 'The Listener'. Thisbe, a maiden of Babylon, was forbidden by her parents to marry her beloved Pyramus. The two lovers defied their families by exchanging vows through a chink in the wall which divided their houses, and plotted to elope together, fixing upon a white mulberry bush at the tomb of Ninus as the appointed spot. Arriving at the site, Thisbe was surprised by a lioness, fresh from the kill, and, in her haste to escape into a nearby cave, let slip her veil. The lioness mauled the veil, coating it with the blood of her prey. On his arrival, Pyramus discovered the cloth and believing it to be stained with the blood of his love, stabbed himself through the heart. Thisbe, coming out from hiding, found Pyramus' body and overcome with grief, threw herself upon his sword. Their mingled blood seeped into the ground and turned the fruit of the mulberry tree black as a sign of mourning for them.

 




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WahooArt.com - John William Waterhouse
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Thisbe (aka The Listener) by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917, Italy) | Oil Painting | WahooArt.com
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Thisbe (aka The Listener) (1909) is an oil painting by the English Pre-Raphaelite painter John William Waterhouse. Also known as 'The Listener'. Thisbe, a maiden of Babylon, was forbidden by her parents to marry her beloved Pyramus. The two lovers defied their families by exchanging vows through a chink in the wall which divided their houses, and plotted to elope together, fixing upon a white mulberry bush at the tomb of Ninus as the appointed spot. Arriving at the site, Thisbe was surprised by a lioness, fresh from the kill, and, in her haste to escape into a nearby cave, let slip her veil. The lioness mauled the veil, coating it with the blood of her prey. On his arrival, Pyramus discovered the cloth and believing it to be stained with the blood of his love, stabbed himself through the heart. Thisbe, coming out from hiding, found Pyramus' body and overcome with grief, threw herself upon his sword. Their mingled blood seeped into the ground and turned the fruit of the mulberry tree black as a sign of mourning for them.
John William Waterhouse
Oil
Oil